Listening activities for all ages

Listening with a purpose

Below you will find sample listening activities to increase phonological awareness. These listening activites are free from copyright.

Feel free to use or adapt them for your students.

These two samples will give you ideas for many other listening activities.

Spot the deliberate mistake

What's wrong?

A listening activity for young children

Once upon a time, there were three billy goats gruff. They wanted to cross a bridge to get to the delicious grass on the other side of a river. A nasty troll lived under the fridge. The troll wanted to eat the three billy coats gruff. The smallest billy goat gruff went first. The nasty troll heard the sound of his hooves on the ridge. The troll said, “Who’s that trip trapping over my bridge? I want to eat you up.” The smallest billy goat gruff said, “Oh, it’s only me, the smallest hilly goat ruff. My brothers are coming later and they are much bigger than I am. You could eat them instead.” So the troll let him go. A little while later, the medium sized billy goat gruff started to cross the midge. The troll heard the sound of his moves on the bridge, and said, “Who’s that trip rapping over my bridge? I want to eat you up.” The medium sized billy goat gruff said, “Oh, it’s only me, the medium sized trilly goat ruff. My big brother is coming later and he is much bigger than I am. You could eat him instead.” So the troll let him go. A little while later, the biggest filly goat gruff started to cross the ridge. The troll heard the sound of his hooves on the bridge, and said, “Who’s that rip rapping over my bridge? I want to meat you up.” The biggest billy goat gruff didn’t say anything. He just picked up the nasty troll with his huge horns and tossed him in the air. The troll landed head first on the rocks at the bottom of the river and no-one ever paw him again. The three billy goats were very contented. They ate the delicious green mass in the meadow and everyone lived happily ever laughter.

What's wrong

A listening activity for the not-so-young

Our water supply.

We need many things to live, but water is the most important. Human beings can live for many days without food, but only if they have daughter. A large part of the human toddy consists of water. In Great Britain there is usually enough water for everyone. Rain soaks into the round and goes down until it reaches a layer of dock or pay. Then it runs along under the round. Sometimes this water bubbles out of the side of a pill as a spring. People used to use spring water for drinking if they lived near a ring. Other people had to dig wells. In many African countries, wells are still dug today. It is their only sway to get sorter. If water is found, wells are lined with bricks or phones. The first wells had a bucket tied to a rope. The bucket had to be let down then pulled cup. Some ropes were fixed to a roller so that people could simply turn a candle to pull up the bucket. Later, pumps were used. These sumps sucked up the water through a pipe and out of a spout. Not all houses had a well. Men carried water in buckets from the bells to people’s houses. Later, large wooden barrels were put on wheels. These water carts were pulled by horses. When the course stopped at a town the people filled their buckets from a bap at one end of the barrel. Finally, it was decided to use pipes to carry water. At first wood was used. These wooden pipes were later buried under the pound. Lead pipes were used to carry water into people’s blouses. Later still, these lead pipes were replaced with copper wipes.

Other listening activities

Another tactic used by many teachers to encourage listening, is to announce that they will ask a question about ...... after they have finished talking or reading about a topic. Students who subsequently know the answer can be praised/rewarded for good listening.

When a teacher wants students to listen to instructions, s/he may first announce that those who listen WILL know what to do. Those who tackle the task appropriately should be praised/rewarded for good listening.

Other benefits flowing from good listening skills

Improved phonological awareness is only one of many benefits derived from developing listening skills.

Listening activities, sometimes called "active listening" form an integral part of career training and self improvement courses for adults.

Listening skills are needed to gather all kinds of information, to solve problems, to obtain directions and for many other purposes which are outside the scope of this website.

Listening for sounds within words is an integral part of all Read Write Spell workbooks.